Roses – Of Course
How to grow roses
Peaches Ripening on Tree
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Darwin Tulips
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Roses, Corn & Peaches
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Under the Grape Arbor
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My Garden Journal
Jan. 28 - Filled the bird feeders and shoveled snow. Lots and lots of snow.
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Cut Flowers
Bird Feeders & Roses
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Heaven on Earth Rose
Chives, Sage & Roses
Corn & Peach Trees
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Day Lilies
Cut Zinnias
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Potted Snapdragons
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Posts Tagged ‘gardens’

Growing Lots of Veggies in Small Spaces – It’s Time To Build Your Raised Beds

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Raised vegetable bed ready for planting

Since our yard is less than 1/4 acre, and there were so many things we really wanted in the yard, we didn’t have a lot of space to grow vegetables…and we really wanted to grow vegetables. So, we tried the raised bed method and it has been a great success.

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Raised vegetable bed with tomatoes and corn

The raised beds not only grow vegetables in abundance, but they look neater in the yard and make it easier to take care of the plants.

You will be amazed at the variety of vegetables that can be grown in raised beds. Last year we even tried corn. We did the ‘3 sisters’ thing of growing green beans to climb the stalks and the squash to grow all underneath.  We’ve also grown lots and lots of sugar snap peas and English peas, Swiss chard, lettuce, beets, okra, rutabagas, cucumbers, collards, turnips, spinach, bok choy, carrots, kale, tomatoes, yellow squash, zucchini.

Stepping outside to pick fresh vegetables for dinner is so much more fun than running to the grocery store.

We only have three raised beds which measure 16′ by 4′ and they don’t take up a lot of our yard space. If you’re interested in learning how to build your own raised beds (yes, there is a right way and a wrong way), Click Here!

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Raised Bed Vegetable Garden and grapes growing on the fence behind it.

Since spring and summer come late here, we have to wait till mid-May to plant a lot of things, but our peas, lettuce and Swiss chard are all coming up now. Many of the cool weather veggies will finish early in the summer and can then be planted again in the late summer or early fall for a later crop.

 

It won’t be long before I can say goodby to the produce isle at the supermarket.

 

Gardening Perks

 

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Yellow lilies in front yard

An unexpected thing I enjoy about our garden is getting to talk to so many people as they pass by, some strolling, some on bikes and many in cars. We live on a corner just off Main Street in our little town of about 40,000 and so it feels like we live in Mayberry, with so many friendly people. Anyway, one day a man walking his dog stopped to talk and was telling me how much he appreciated me putting the names by the plants so passersby could know what they were. I told him I hadn’t thought about the people passing by, I was just trying to remember the names of plants and what was planted where.

I moved out here to the West almost 3 years ago and even though I’d gardened for such a long time in the south (zones 7 & 8), there were so many plants out here (zone 5b/6a and elevation ca.5000′) that I’d never heard of and didn’t recognize. Really, there were very few of the ones I was use to growing that would grow out here. So if you think you have to know a lot to be a gardener, then I’m living proof that you don’t. I started reading a lot, I now have 154 gardening books (I just counted out of curiosity), almost all second hand. I like to be able to look up anything I need to know about. I do use the internet a lot but I get a lot of help from books.

Back to the names on the plants…I use metal wire stakes with a metal plate to write on. They work great for helping me to remember the plant name and to mark the spot where it’s planted so in the spring when I’m looking for places to put new plants I’ll know that place is reserved for something that will be coming up soon.

When I have spaces to fill I like to plant annuals that have plenty of blooms to use and share, like Cosmos and Zinnias, which can grow quite tall if they’re happy. Last year I had a profusion of blooms along the sidewalk outside the picket fence on the South side  of our yard (our house faces West) and large areas covered in blooms inside the fence.I try to get everyone to come and cut bouquets from the zinnias and cosmos because it encourages more blooms and it makes people happy.

One afternoon as I was sitting on a little stool weeding by the front sidewalk a little girl, about 8 years old, came riding by on her bike and stopped to talk. She gave me one of my favorite compliments when she said, “Your yard looks like a flower forest.”

How could I not like that?

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Cosmos by sidewalk on south side of house

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Lavender and daisies in front yard by grape vines.

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by Eliza Osborn

We Are Growing Bamboo in Our Garden – Are We Crazy?

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Using bamboo in the landscape

My husband and I both love bamboo, it is so tropical looking and beautiful. Last year we started talking about bamboo and the idea of trying to grow it in our climate. I didn’t think that we could because of our harsh winters. With some research though, I was happy to see that there are some kinds of bamboo that will grow here.

I don’t claim to be an expert on bamboo, but I have done some research on it and I’m just sharing with you some of the things that I’ve found out about it. Besides being beautiful, bamboo is really amazing. It is fast growing, yet easy to control if you understand how it grows (more on that later), is an unusual plant that can provide a privacy screen or a focal point in your landscape.

Since bamboo is a grass, it needs high nitrogen fertilizers, just like you lawn. It needs sunshine and a constant supply of moisture. It shouldn’t be allowed to dry out but it can’t grow in standing water either. The soil should be well drained and rich in organic matter. Mulching helps to keep the moisture in and the weeds down so there will be not competition for the roots.

Not all bamboo is alike, it comes in a variety of colors and growth patterns. It can grow 6′ tall, 15′ or 25′. Some can get 70′ feet tall in the right environment, but in the home garden, most will probably be less tall than their maximum height.

There are basically two kinds of bamboo, clumping and running. The beautiful, exotic bamboo shown here, are all running types of bamboo. The clumping bamboo won’t get big and gorgeous like these, it has a shrubby, weedy look to me.

Bamboo has a bad reputation for being very invasive and aggressive. It takes a few years to get established but when it does, it can be very fast growing (up, as well as out). As I understand it, the plant only sends up shoots for a couple of months in the spring. After that time, no more shoots will come up till the next spring. When the shoots come up outside the area you want the bamboo to grow, just let them get a few inches to a foot tall and then just kick them over. They are very tender during this time and easily removed. What’s more, another shoot won’t come up in that spot. Also, all bamboo are edible and so the shoots that are kicked over can be eaten (especially good in oriental cooking).

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Beautiful gray bamboo in bamboo forest in China

You can also keep the area mowed (or use a weed eater) to keep the shoots from growing.

A barrier can be put down around the area as well. Since bamboo roots are pretty shallow, only going to about 12″-15″, a 2′ barrier would prevent the spread of the roots and shoots. Remember, this is a plant, not a monster that can’t be controlled.

We found a great place to get our bamboo, with very reasonable prices and a wide choices of plants. We actually went there ourselves and toured the extensive bamboo gardens. I fell in love with bamboo and I can’t wait to have ours growing tall and magnificent in our garden.

The bamboo nursery we found is called Steve Ray’s Bamboo Garden and is in Alabama.

It is found online at: http://www.thebamboogardens.com/

The types of bamboo we picked out for our garden are all hardy in our zone. Click on the “Zone Map” button above to see the temperatures for your zone. We chose Phyllostachys aureosulcata – Yellow Groove Bamboo with is hardy to -10′; P. humilis – which is hardy to 0′ and p. nigra “Henon” – Giant Gray Bamboo, hardy to 0′. This one the stalks can get 4″ thick. Can’t wait to see that.

Just thought you might like to consider something new for your garden and landscape.

If you enjoyed this post, please consider clicking on the “Plus 1” button, and any of the social media buttons. Thanks so much.

 

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Unusual joints in bamboo stalks.

 

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Bamboo, an unusual and beautiful landscape plant

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by Eliza Osborn

Where to start? – How To Plan a Garden, How To Plant a Garden – How To Be a Gardener

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Back yard in 2009, before garden planted, arbor and deck built

I’m trying to decide whether to began at the end or the beginning. Maybe I’ll just jump back and forth.

I mentioned in “About Us” that in 2009 we’d bought a very old home in the Rocky Mountains (zone 5b-6a) and had taken up most of our lawn. I didn’t mention that we also took down four huge trees and many large, old shrubs. You can imagine what a mess our yard looked. But…we had a plan.

Here is a picture of our yard when we began laying it out. The big crater is where a large stump was ground out and where the Queen Elizabeth roses now stand beside the deck. You can see 2 of the 5 little peach trees planted early that spring. The small one on the end is stunted because deer ate the top out of it when it first put on leaves.

Peach trees, Queen Elizabeth roses, hyacinth bean tower

Peach trees, Queen Elizabeth roses, hyacinth bean tower

I think the neighbors were a little worried about the nut jobs that had moved in next door. It did look pretty bad but we did put up a privacy fence to protect their eyes. Of course the picket fence in the front yard didn’t hide very much and the front yard looked this bad too.

 

 

 

 

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by Eliza Osborn

Herbs I’ve Grown and Loved

 

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Growing favorite herbs in the herb garden for cooking

I started growing herbs when my Aunt Pearl, who lives in Georgia and is also a gardener, gave me a large pot planted with herbs. I’ve been growing them ever since. I like to mix them in among other perennials, although I have had beds with just herbs in them. Herbs are so easy to grow and since you need to keep pinching them back to make the plant fuller and to prevent blooming, you have plenty to use in cooking and you’ll have plenty to share, since it really is good for the plant to get pinched back. In most cases it would be hard to use that much of any herb. When I prune them back I put the clippings I’m not going to use in a basket on my kitchen counter. The smell is wonderful.

Put the ones you are planning on using in a glass with water in the fridge and they will stay fresh until  you need them. When using fresh herbs in recipes you’ll need to use a larger amount (about 2-3 times as much) because measurements are usually for dried herbs, which have much less volume. Fresh herbs make such a difference in foods. For example, potato salad is a whole different dish when prepared with fresh oregano, thyme, parsley and chives. The flavors are so fresh and wonderful.

Some can be grown from seeds and some can’t. Some can be dried and used, some frozen. If you’re interested in planting herbs, now is a good time for planting the hardy ones. Depending on where you live, Rosemary is iffy, and basil surely can’t take the cold but most others are pretty hardy. I’ll talk more about herbs later, but for now you really should consider herbs for your garden. You’ll fall in love.

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by Eliza Osborn

 

 

How To Start a Garden

hyssop, sedum, phlox and rhubarb

2011 - Agastache, Sedum, Phlox and Rhubarb

This question comes up a lot and I think the best place to start a garden is not with a shovel and dirt but with pencil and paper.

Gardening is a growing interest and a lot of people, even though they want to garden, just don’t know how to get started. Even a small bed can produce a great amount of flowers or vegetables.
Here is a link to an article I’d written that might be of some help. Check it out.

http://ezinearticles.com/?How-To-Start-a-Garden-In-5-Easy-Steps&id=6559034

before deck was built

2009 - Newly planted Agastache and sedum

 

potted plum tree and flowers by back door

2011 - Deck with potted plum tree and flowers.

 

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by Eliza Osborn

Starting a Vegetable Garden…It’s Easy

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Very small vegetable garden

Many people, who have never gardened before, are considering growing their own food this year and backyard vegetable gardens are becoming quite popular. If you’re reading this, then likely you are already a gardener, but if not, and you want to start a garden, don’t be intimidated.

 

 

 

It’s easy, if you follow these simple steps:

  • Plan
  •  Prepare the Bed
  •  Layout the Plan and then Plant
  • Water and Keep Moist Till Germination
  • Watch Garden Grow

For information about each of these steps, check out this article:  http://ezinearticles.com/?How-To-Start-a-Garden-In-5-Easy-Steps&id=6559034

Gardening should come with a warning, because it is very addicting.

 

Beautiful Beets In The Garden

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Beets from the garden, pickled and put away.

Okay, back to the seed catalogs.

As you plan your vegetable garden, don’t overlook beets. They are so easy to grow and you can eat the tops as well as the roots.Beets are full of potassium, calcium, folic acid and antioxidants…in case you actually need a reason to eat beets.

The tops are wonderful steamed with a little garlic and tossed with some balsamic vinegar. I think the roots are best pickled, but some people like them cooked with a little butter and salt. There are so many good recipes using beets. Find some here: http://allrecipes.com/recipes/fruits-and-vegetables/vegetables-a-m/beets/

Composting…SO Important For The Garden

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Finished compost

To some people, composting is a totally boring subject, but to a gardener who is interested in increasing the production and beauty of the garden, it is a very fascinating topic.

So much has been written on “How To” that it can seem a little  intimidating. It really is easy, and so worth the effort.

I’ve found a site that is all about composting and has some excellent information. It breaks it all down and de-mystifies the whole process. Check it out at: http://www.composterconnection.com/site/how-to.html

In Planning Your Garden…Consider the Leaves

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Colored foliage for the garden

I love a garden full of flowers, flowers everywhere. But even the best of best plants don’t have flowers on them all season. Besides, all those flowers need a little background music.

For colors and contrast in the garden, some plants have foliage that can compete with flowers.

As you look through all those gardening catalogs, or as you stroll through your local plant nursery this spring, have a look at the foliage plants.

Hostas are nice because they come in blue, blue green,deep green, lime green, yellow green, not to mention all the variegated ones.

Heuchera, or Coral Bells, is another nice plant. The leaves can be beautifully green or a rainbow of colors.

For more ideas, check out this post: http://wp.me/p1OXDF-Xy

 

Winter In The Garden – What’s Going On?

The quick answer to that is…not much. Or so it seems.

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Peach trees, roses, raised bed and snow

Many plants, especially fruit trees and some perennials, need these cold temperatures. They have a cycle they must go through, that’s why refrigerating bulbs can force them to bloom early. Some fruits trees need a minimum of 1,000 hours of freezing temperatures to bear fruit. So a lot is going on with the plants, just not in the leafy, green, growing sort of way.

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Peach trees, corn, roses and feverfew, lemon balm

 

 

 

 

 

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Queen Elizabeth roses in summer

 

 

The rose bushes look so pitiful and almost dead. They will be pruned back just as the buds begin to swell in early spring.

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Queen Elizabeth rose bushes in winter

 

 

 

 

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Raspberry, rhubard bed in winter

The raspberry bed looks so empty without all that lush foliage. They will be back bigger, thicker and better than last year. The rhubarb plants that share that bed seem to have

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Raspberries and rhubarb in July,

disappeared, but they will also be back, bigger than before.

 

 

 

 

The raised vegetable bed is empty, the corn, green beans and squash long gone. Next year we will add more compost to rejuvenate the soil for the next vegetables to grow there.

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Asparagus Bed mid July, 2011

 

 

 

The asparagus has gone to sleep, with the plants all collapsed down with a covering of snow to insulate them. They will be some of the first to make their appearance next spring. Can’t wait.

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Asparagus bed in winter (What looks like boulders is plants collapsed down)

 

 

 

 

 

So much to look forward to in the spring. The dormant time in the garden is a really good time to learn about some of the things that need to be done when spring finally gets here…like pruning fruit trees and rose bushes, dividing and transplanting perennials that have outgrown their space, starting and maintaining a compost pile, deciding on what vegetables to grow this year…..and on and on.

That’s why gardening is so interesting and so much fun. There is always more to learn, always something to do and always so much to enjoy in a garden.

Bamboo of Las Vegas

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Beautiful Bamboo and Bromeliads in Las Vegas

 

After seeing the gorgeous bamboo growing at the Bellagio in Las Vegas, I’m getting so excited for spring to get here to see if the bamboo we planted in our garden is going to survive our winters (we live in zone 6) and come up like it’s supposed to.

We planted 4 large clumps (3 different kind) and they are the hardiest of the non-clumping bamboo, so we have our fingers crossed that one day the bamboo growing in our yard will look as magnificent as what we’re seeing here in Las Vegas.They look like they could be the same species as the ones we’ve planted. (See post http://wp.me/p1OXDF-pC)

I talked before about the 4 large clumps we brought back (in our SUV) all the way from Alabama. The nursery we bought from  is found online at: http://www.thebamboogardens.com/  I don’t think we’ll give up though, if it happens to not come up. We did get it planted a little late in the season and we would try again, maybe planting it earlier to give the roots more time to become established before the winter cold set in.

You see, we love bamboo, and we’re determined to have some in our garden. I’m sure these photos explain the allure.

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Bamboo in Las Vegas

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Las Vegas bamboo in the Bellagio Atrium

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Bamboo and oranges growing in Las Vegas at the Bellagio

 

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Bamboo in the atrium of the Bellagio in Las Vegas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Vacation At Last

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Las Vegas Vacation on the horizon

Well, I can’t garden so I might as well head south and enjoy some warm sunny weather. Right?

We’ve been out in the snowy and freezing weather today and that will make us appreciate the warmer climate even more.

I’ll be taking, and sharing, pictures of any gardens I can find. Since we are headed for Las Vegas I’m not sure how many will be at their peak. There is a gorgeous, gigantic atrium at one of the casinos though, and I will be taking pictures in there.

Ah… the sunshine, pool and the hot tub are calling my name. Besides, I’ll enjoy the snow so much more after having been away from it for a week.

 

Picture It…Vines Blooming All Through The Garden

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Clematis in bloom

Okay, I’m hooked on Clematis. They have such beautiful flowers and they bloom for such a long time. I have them all over the yard and I look forward to them maturing and adding so much color to my garden.

There are so many different vines that have beautiful blossoms though, like Wisteria, Trumpet Vine, Bougainvillea,  Star Jasmine, Morning Glory, Climbing Hydrangea, and Honeysuckle, just to name a few. No matter what climate you live in, you can have beautiful, flowering vines.Vines can grow on fences, on porch posts and railings, on arbors, against the side of the house or garage, over a pergola or even up into the trees and tall shrubs. Since vines use different methods of climbing, it’s important to know how they grow, to know what they can grow on.

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Star Jasmine

 

  • Twiners  –  As they grow, their stems wrap around whatever they are climbing on. Good examples of twiners are Wisteria, Clematis and Morning Glory. Twiners can grow on fences, lattices, post and in trees.
  • Tendrils – These vines have little threadlike tendrils that curl around the support. Sweet Peas climb by tendrils. They can grow on chain link fencing, netting and into trees and tall shrubs.
  • Rootlets– To hold fast to their support, these vines have little pads of roots that attach to whatever it is climbing. They can climb on bricks, masonry, tree trunks, rocks and wooden post. Climbing Hydrangea is a vine that uses rootlets to support it’s great weight as it climbs.
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Wisteria Blossoms

Some flowering vines are delicate and light (such as Clematis) while others can get very heavy (Climbing Hydrangea for instance), and grow to be very large. By doing a little research, it will be easy to put just the right bloomers in just the right place in your garden. Just between you and me…you can’t go wrong with Clematis though. Some stay small while others can grow 20′ or more. Once you have one blooming in your garden, you’ll be trying to make room for more…and more.

Get out those catalogs (you did order yours, didn’t you?) and have a look at the variety of beautiful, flowering vines for your garden. Check out post http://wp.me/p1OXDF-Ub for info on ordering gardening/plant catalogs.

 

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Honeysuckle vine

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Bouganvilla

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Morning Glory vine and flowers

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Trumpet vine

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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A Reminder…Have You Ordered Your Gardening Catalogs?

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Tulips growing in the spring garden

I have received some comments that reminded me, (I can’t believe I had forgotten) of one of gardeners’ favorite winter pastimes.

Looking at gardening and seed catalogs and planning the next garden, or garden project, is a fun way to spend cold winter hours. It helps to get ideas for next spring, trying to find a new and better strain of this or that. It is certainly a favorite thing for me to do and by the time warmer weather finally gets here, our catalogs are pretty worn and tattered.

Where do you get these catalogs? Most garden and seed nurseries have online sites and offer free catalogs to be sent to your home. Order up some now and by the time the holidays are over, you may have a stack of catalogs to enjoy. Here is a partial list of possibilities for you.

As you go through these catalogs, not only will you become familiar with gardening terms, but you will learn about each plant that interest you. You’ll know if it is a perennial and if it will bloom all summer or just in the spring. You’ll find out how big it should get, so you will know where to use it in the garden.

These catalogs are a great source of knowledge that shouldn’t be overlooked. There are many, many other online nurseries out there, so check them out, find new ones.

Start making a list of the plants that appeal to you and in which catalogs you found them in. When you’ve planned your garden, then it’s easy to order the seeds or plants and have them delivered to your door in time for planting in the spring.

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Garden Design Video

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Beside our future front gate

 

 

Check out this fun, quickie, garden design video…

Paying Attention To The Foliage In The Garden

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Leaves contrasting in size, shape and color.

Sometimes, we focus so much on the flowers in our garden, we forget to notice the foliage. The variety of shapes, sizes and colors that leaves come in, is amazing. If you plan it right, you can have a very beautiful and colorful garden using plants that have no, or insignificant, blooms.

The foliage has always been important as a backdrop for the flowers. Can you picture a garden with just stems and flowers and no leaves? Leaves have always played an important part in the design of the garden, but I’m just saying that they don’t have to be just in the background.

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Colored leaves of Coleus

By placing plants with contrasting leaves, whether is size, texture or color, near each other, it creates interest. In some shady gardens, it is really hard to get light and color in with blossoms, but some plants, such as coleus, can add color to the shady garden, and by using the light colored coleus, can add light to a darkened area. Coleus do bloom, but the blooms are incidental and usually pinched off to help the plant.

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Strappy, spikey leaves in the garden

Have a look at these pictures and see if you get any ideas of ways to get more texture and interest into your garden.

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Beautiful color and texture

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Good contrast in hosta and fern leaves

 

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Beautiful colors and patterns

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Elephant ears

 

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Curly leaf parsley is beautiful in the garden.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Delicate leaves in the garden

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Can I Compost?

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Compost material - household waste

Composting….who does it and why?

I know who compost. Gardeners do, that’s who. To a gardener, compost is black gold. Compost is used to enrich poor soil, to add organic matter to soil that will continue to break down and become black loam. It will continue to enrich the soil and nourish plants. Compost tea is the best tonic for your plants and about the best liquid fertilizer you can use. Compost is also used to mulch around plants, to keep weeds from growing, to keep the roots of plants cool, to hold in moisture and to, again, nourish the plant. It is possible to buy compost from garden centers, but if you need a lot of compost, like we do, then you’d better have some of the yellow gold to buy that black gold.

On the other hand, making your own compost is relatively inexpensive, even free, and it’s pretty easy to make. Most of what you need to create your own compost is available in great quantities, grass clippings, trimmings from the garden, dead leaves, house hold vegetable and fruit scraps and if you are really lucky, farm animal manure. (Just so you know, cow manure is better than horse manure, because they have more stomachs to break down their food, and there aren’t as many surviving seeds to spread

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Partially composted material

around in your garden. At least that is what I’ve been told)

For those who are into recycling, this is a perfect way to recycle these wasted products, instead of taking up space in our landfills. Actually a word about that…Cities and towns are getting smarter about that as well, and many are composting the plant material picked up by their crews, and either using it in city parks etc. or selling it back to the public to use in their yards and gardens. We are fortunate enough to live where that is being done, and the price isn’t too bad. We hadn’t yet made enough compost for our yard, so last spring we bought quite a bit from the city.

Compost projects don’t have to be huge though, you can start small and still get a lot of compost. Since we took up almost all of our lawn and planted the entire yard (1/4 acre) in fruit trees, perennial and herb beds and raised beds for vegetables, we really needed a lot of compost. We didn’t have enough grass clippings (remember, we took up almost all of our lawn) so when we would see landscape workers, mowers etc. filling up a truck with grass clippings, we would just ask them to dump the load in our yard. This not only got us a great supply of beautiful green clippings, but it also saved them a trip to the dump. Leaves, raked and bagged and left on the curb for the city to pick up, are an important ingredient in compost.

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Finished compost - Black Gold

I’ll write more in depth about composting later, but the important thing to think about is…can you do it? Are you up for gathering the organic materials you need, for turning the heap occasionally and spraying it with water if it dries out?

If you do compost, then you are a gardener, because composters are gardeners.

 

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New Pages on Flowers

Bouquet of dahlia,anemone,liatris,zinnia,

Have you checked out the new pages that are being created? Click on the tabs on the left or on the top to see the “Flowers” , “Annuals”,”Biennials” and “Perennials” pages that are being created. There is a lot more information to be added of course, but I hope you find the pages helpful as you plan your flower garden.

My Treasure Trove Of Gardening Books Which I Refer To Often

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Part of library which includes gardening books

Long before there was an Internet or Super Highway of Information, there were books; gardening books written on any subject you could imagine. Sometimes, even though we can just Google any subject we are curious about, it is nice to be able to refer to a book. Books are not all created equal, of course, and some are chock full of information and get referred to over and over again. Some of my books are interesting and filled with pretty pictures, but I don’t often open them. It’s easy to tell which of the books in my garden library are of most use to me, by the worn look of some of them.

Some of my books have been given to me as gifts, some I’ve bought new, but the majority have come from second hand book stores, thrift stores and garage sales. If I had paid retail for all of my books, my library would be worth a small fortune. I would suggest to start your own garden library, even if you start with only one book. Become familiar with all the information in that book. You’ll be surprised at how little nuggets of knowledge can come to you when you need them.

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Gardening books

Look for books on the topics that interest you the most and you won’t be able to put the book down until you’ve devoured all the  information  in it. I’m partial to roses, herbs and perennials so I look for books on those subjects. My interest has gradually spread, so  I had to look for a wider variety of books. Now I not only have books on gardening (roses, perennials, growing herbs, raised bed gardening, organic gardening, growing fruits and vegetables and annuals) but I also have books on garden design, how to landscape, how to deal with problems in the garden like pests and disease, container

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gardening books

gardening and all about birds and how to attract them to my garden. I even have books about decks and arbors etc. and potting sheds. Since my gardening books are used as reference books, I keep them accessible and always at my fingertips.

 

Thank goodness for smart people who write books and share what they know.

 

 

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garden books as reference

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Our Garden Gate
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